September 2020 virtual meeting

by the Reaction Research Society


The Reaction Research Society met on September 11, 2020, by teleconference. Several members called in from out of state. After calling the meeting to order and the reading of the treasurer’s report, we began to discuss events to come and those in planning.

Attendees of the Seotember 2020 meeting by teleconference

MTA WORK EVENT 10/3/2020

The next event at the Mojave Test Area will be on Saturday, October 3rd. This will be a work event to repair our large adjustable rail launcher, remove tumbleweeds and brush from around our site, fix the two cut strands of barbed wire at our front gate, clean off corrosion from several areas and also potentially replace the bent panel on the vertical thrust stand. Osvaldo is leading the work event and all members are encouraged to come out. In addition to bringing sunscreeen, proper desert attire and footwear, bringing work gloves will be very useful.

John Krell wearing his facemask standing before our front gate with two of the barbed wire strands cut. This is one of many things to be repaired at the MTA.
Bent panel on the vertical test stand
The 8-inch adjustable rail launcher is still under repair from the failed July 2019 launch. The inner adjustable rail slides are being built from scratch. One of the outer braces was blown off and some of the angle frame pieces are distorted. This will require a lot of rework but we hope to have this launcher back in service soon.

As with all events at the MTA, social distancing and facemasks are required by all attendees at this event. Newcomers must request permission to attend and sign our indemnification waiver in advance of their arrival. See our website for these forms and submit them to the RRS president.

At this same event, we may also have a few launches if members are ready to do so. Dave Nordling was appointed to be the pyro-op in charge for this day. Wolfram Blume had planned to attempt his first flight of the two-stage Gas Guzzler to verify the staging and recovery systems. The nitrous-oxide hybrid motor is also ready for another launch attempt at this event.

Bill Inman also plans to join us at the MTA to conduct some tests of his solar concentrator to be used with his next generation steam rocket still in build.

NEW RESTROOM FACILITY AT THE MTA

Last year, the executive council set priorities for improvements at the Mojave Test Area. At the top of the list was building a new restroom facility which would offer our guests greater comfort than the current facility.

Larry Hoffing and Dave Nordling have begun to approach potential contractors willing and able to build a modest facility at our site. No formal proposals have yet been received yet but the society expects to have more to share in the coming month. With the hot summer months receding and the cooler temperatures of autumn approaching it is a perfect time to begin this project.

Given our modest budget, we are asking for donations to help the society make this much asked for and much needed improvement. Donations to the RRS are tax deductible as we are a registered 501(c)3 educational non-profit group in California. Our Paypal link is one our website and if there are any questions please contact the RRS president or any member of the executive council.

2021 RRS SYMPOSIUM

It was recommended that we try to set a firm date for the 2021 RRS Symposium with the Ken Nakaoka Community Center on a Saturday in late March. Although it is not certain if the symposium can be held, preparation for the symposium can take many months. Frank was going to see if a tenative date could be established only for planning purposes. If COVID-19 restrictions in Los Angeles were lifted to allow our symposium, we would have little time for advanced planning. There’s liitle to lose in scheduling the event and postponing if it becomes necessary.

IN CLOSING

Contact the RRS secretary with questions. Next meeting will be held virtually on October 9, 2020, 7:30pm. Contact the RRS secretary for details.


August 2020 virtual meeting

By Dave Nordling, Reaction Research Society


In the absence of our secretary, I took a few notes from the meeting. This is what I recorded. Contact the RRS secretary for updates and corrections.

The Reaction Research Society held its monthly meeting by teleconference on August 14, 2020. Our monthly meetings are always held on the 2nd Friday of every month. We’ve had a lot of success with holding our meetings remotely and we will likely continue for the next coming months to continue our commitment to safety in light of the pandemic. Our membership is in regular contact with our community which has allowed us to promote and hold events including our first launch at the Mojave Test Area (MTA) on July 25, 2020. You can read the details in the firing report posted on this website.

Our members are doing well and thus far no one has reported being infected with COVID-19 which we hope continues to be the case. Frank is in regular contact with the Los Angeles Police Department’s (LAPD) Community Safety Partnership (CSP) but under current circumstances, the next school event may not be until next year. Options are being considered on how to continue our educational programs while maintaining social distancing.

The August 2020 RRS meeting held by teleconference.

REVIEW OF THE 7/25/2020 LAUNCH EVENT OPERATIONS

The first topic was the recent launch event we held on July 25th at the Mojave Test Area for the first time since the start of the pandemic. We had some difficulties in operating under the summer heat (106 Fahenheit at the peak) but this is nothing unusual for this time of year. Many of us were well prepared for the hot sun with our hats, sunscreen and iced beverages and chilled water. We also did a good job of watching out for each other. Still, the heat was responsible for leaving all but one of the micrograin rockets downrange. It also underscores the importance good planning, coordination and putting safety over all other considerations. We had several mis-fires which we were able to resolve, but maintaining discipline during the event proved to be a larger challenge. The launch protocols will be explained more thoroughly in the next safety briefing. The meeting highlighted that every member and pyro-op attending the event holds a joint responsibilty for the safety of all and it starts with self-discipline and patience by all.

Getting the beta rocket ready in the launcher on 7/25/2020 and setting the camera

We also discussed proper protocols such as announcing the pyro-op in charge well before the event and the necessity of providing detailed information about the intended operations to the pyro-op in charge in advance. Most of the planned projects were well understood as they were micrograin rockets and the previous hybrid rocket attempted at the last launch event.

DATA REVIEW OF THE STANDARD ALPHA FLIGHT OF 7/25/2020

The only micrograin rocket to be recovered from the launch event of 7/25/2020 was the standard alpha with plain steel nozzle. John Krell has been developing progressively better and more powerful avionics payloads designed to fit the narrow confines of the RRS standard alpha payload tube. John was able to spot and recover one of his payloads and process the flight data captured that day. The avionics payload was intact after being extracted from the desert floor including the solid-state data chip. John was able to recover the data and accurately reveal the huge acceleration of the RRS standard alpha with unprecedented accuracy. A peak acceleration of 114 G’s was recorded at roughly 0.3 seconds just before tail-off and burn-out at 0.4 seconds from launch. I was able to screen capture his plot below.

John Krell’s presentation of the data from the one recovered alpha ( to date).

The second plot shows the velocity derived from the accelerometer readings in the half-second which captures burnout at 0.4 seconds. Burnout velocity was measured at 670 feet/second which is consistent with prior data and trajectory predictions. The alpha is subsonic but travels at substantial speed from the swift acceleration. Given the high air temperature that day, 106 Fahrenheit, the speed of sound was 1165 ft/sec. The altitude of burnout was determined to be 130 feet which is consistent with prior flight data and high speed video footage.

Trajectory plot of the standard alpha flight from 7/25/2020

The third plot was made for the whole flight of standard alpha from the 7/25/2020 event from launch to impact at 35 seconds. Given the roets were impacting 2000 to 3000 feet downrange, the sound delay matches with the time to impact witnessed in the observation bunker. The maximum altitude was just over 4,400 feet based on the barometric pressure measurements using the 1976 standard atmosphere model. Base atmospheric pressure reading at the start of the flight shows the elevation of alpha launch rail platform is 2,048 feet.

Trajectory of the standard alpha flown on 7/25/2020

John Krell has really accomplished something with these custom avionics packages. He has been mentoring some of our other RRS members and the society encourages other members to build and fly their own payloads to spread the knowledge.

John Krell and Bill Behenna discuss avionics payloads

The society hopes to recover the other two alphas and the beta for further data analysis. Both of the unrecovered alphas from this last launch event had ceramic coated nozzles which should not erode. This should result in a more ideal performance as the throat area will not open up. The actual effect of this design improvement can best be assessed with recorded flight data. Also, we hope to compare the trajectory of the four-foot propellant tube with the standard length. Lastly. if the beta is recovered with recorded flight data, we may be able to assess its performance in unprecedented detail. The society hopes to report this flight data soon.

IMPROVEMENTS TO THE NITROUS OXIDE FILL/DRAIN MANIFOLD

The failure to launch the second build of the hybrid rocket was discussed at the August 2020 meeting. After discussing the launch procedures and corrective actions followed during the attempt to launch the nitrous oxide hybrid at the MTA with Osvaldo (the Level 1 pyro-op in charge) and racing experts at Nitrous Supply Inc., Huntington Beach, California, the cause of the fill valve’s failure to open became clear.

nitroussupply.com

In the racing industry, these normally-closed direct-acting solenoid valves are commonly used to open the flow of stored nitrous oxide bottles against the full supply pressure in the storage bottle. These are called “purge solenoid valves” among racers because it is this solenoid valve that opens the flow of nitrous oxide which displaces or purges out the air in the engine lines during the race. Buying these 12-volt DC high pressure solenoid valves from racing suppliers is much cheaper given they are made in greater numbers for the racing industry. (~$120 each versus $400+ each from reputable solenoid valve manufacturers).

In researching common designs for normally closed (NC) solenoid valves, the excessive heat of that day simply created too much inlet pressure against the internal valve seat for the electromagnetic solenoid coil to overcome and open the flow path. 1000 psig is likely the limit to reliably open these valves according to advice given by Nitrous Supply Inc. who has decades of practical experience at racing tracks around the country using purge solenoid valves for an application nearly identical to the needs of hybrid rocketry fill and drain operations. The ambient temperature at the MTA on launch day was creating a bottle temperature of 1400 psig accordling to the bottle pressure gauge and the separate pressure gauge in the manifold when the bottle was opened. This is well above the 900 psi recommended pressure range seen by marking on the gauge. The bottle, valve body and fittings are rated for these higher pressures, but opening mechanism of the solenoid valve was not.

A color-coded example of direct-acting normally closed solenoid valve is below. Blue shows the high pressure fluid path which is holding the seat down along with some assistance from an internal spring only for low inlet pressure conditions. With current applied to the electromagnetic solenoid (Orange), it pulls up on the moving armature (in red) which then allows the fluid to slip past the seal and through the flow control orifice when commanded open. Only a slight amount of movement is necessary to lift open the valve. However, if the fluid inlet pressure is too great, the solenoid can not provide enough force to lift and open the seal, therefore the valve stays shut.

Example of a direct-acting normally closed (NC) solenoid valve courtesy of M & M International (UK) Limited with color added to distinguish key parts.

To understand the relationship between pressure and temperature of the nitrous oxide you must consult the vapor pressure curve for nitrous oxide. This set of data points spans between the triple point and critical point of any pure fluid. NIST provides accurate data to generate such a curve.

webbook.nist.gov

nitrous oxide (N2O) liquid state properties, HTML5 table output from Web-book NIST.gov website
Nitrous oxide (N2O) vapor phase properties, HTML5 table output from Web-book NIST.gov website

The critical point of any pure fluid is where the distinction between gas and liquid phases disappears. This is not necessarily hazardous but it does mark a fundamental change in fluid behavior. The critical point of nitrous oxide (N2O) is 1053.3 psia and 97.6 degrees Fahrenheit according to Air Products company literature. This means the nitrous oxide conditions in the bottle at the launch (1400 psig as read on the gauges with an fluid temperature of 106 Fahrenheit or more) was well in the supercritical range, but again, this is only hazardous if the pressure vessels and plumbing connections aren’t able to safely contain the pressure. If the solenoid valve could have been opened, the pressure drop would have returned the supercritical fluid back to normal conitions and would flow dense liquid into the rocket when the fluid naturally chills down from the expansion.

Both the bottle pressure gauge and the manifold pressure gauge read excessively high on that hot summer day.

Keeping the bottle pressure below 1000 psia means controlling the external temperature of the bottle to a lower temperature. Below is a tabulation of state points along the vapor pressure curve for nitrous oxide (N2O) for common ambient temperatures. You can see that small shifts in ambient temperature can greatly affect the vapor pressure of the pressurized liquid. Keeping nitrous oxide under pressure is the key to retaining its denser liquid state. As long as the tank pressure is above the vapor pressure at that fluid temperature, you will have a liquid phase in the tank. If the pressure on the fluid drops below the vapor pressure, the liquid will begin to boil away.

  • 30 F, 440.05 psia
  • 40 F, 506.63 psia
  • 50 F, 580.33 psia
  • 60 F, 661.71 psia
  • 70 F, 751.46 psia; liquid density 48.21 lbm/ft3, vapor density 0.1145 lbm/ft3
  • 80 F, 850.46 psia
  • 90 F, 960.09 psia
  • 97.6 F, 1053.3 psia; density 28.22 lbm/ft3, CRITICAL POINT
  • Molecular weight = 44.01 lbm/lb-mol
Vapor curve for nitrous oxide over ambient temperature ranges

At first, it was thought that there wasn’t sufficient current from the lawnmower lead-acid battery we use. The summer heat can cause batteries to fail, but even after switching to a car battery, the failure to open was the same. Having a 12-volt solenoid requires greater current to actuate the solenoid valve, but it is a common standard for automotive grade parts which can be less expensive yet reliable. A current draw of 15 Amps over the long cable runs of a few hundred feet can be taxing to the firing circuit battery. This was not the cause of the problem, but it is a regular concern making sure sufficient voltage and current is available to both ignition and valve control.

To exclude outright failure of the solenoid valve, Osvaldo brought the unit home, allowed it to cool to room temperature then dry-cycled the valve from a battery to see if it still actuated. This simple test was successful and the filling valve in our nitrous oxide manifold continues to operate. At the next launch attempt, we will be prepared to chill the nitrous oxide supply bottle with an ice bath if necessary as was originally suggested at the prior launch event. Keeping the bottle pressure in an appropriate pressure range for fill operations is dependent on controlling the fluid temperature (60 to 90 F) under extreme heat or cold environments.

In researching purge solenoid valves, a second 12 VDC normally-closed valve was found and purchased. Nitrous Supply Inc., was out of purge solenoid valves but offered many alternative suppliers in the Los Angeles area. After some searching, I selected a high flow purge solenoid valve sold by Motorcycle Performance Specialties (MPS) Racing in Casselbury, Florida, for the purge solenoid valve used for venting our nitrous oxide manifold. The control panel is already equipped with the second command channel to open the vent from the blockhouse should it be necessary in launch operations. A schematic illustration is provided in this article.

mpsracing.com

Normally-closed 12 VDC purge solenoid valve from MPS Racing in Florida used for nitrous oxide applications including car and motorcycle racing.

The previous drain solenoid valve equipped with the nitrous manifold I bought was not deisgned for the full bottle pressure in the manifold so it quickly failed during initial checkouts. A manual valve was used in its place to carefully bleed out the remaining pressure in the line after the main bottle valve was tightly closed. This second solenoid valve will be used for draining the nitrous in the event of a launch scrub. Although the Contrails hybrid motor already has a small orifice and vent tube at the head end of the nitrous tank to provide slow release of pressure buildup, it is better to have a remote option to quickly depressurize the vehicle if the need arises.

Fill, drain and firing circuit for a Contrails hybrid rocket motor

With some re-plumbing of the nitrous oxide manifold to include the new vent solenoid, a soap-bubble leak check would be needed to prove the system before use. Given the significant overhanging weight of two solenoid valves, it may be wise to mount both valves on a separate plate structure to avoid excessive bending loads on the bottle connection. Design changes like this will be considered in preparation for the next launch event.

PYROTECHNIC OPERATOR TRAINING SESSION BY FRIENDS OF AMATEUR ROCKETRY

Mark Holthaus of the Friends of Amateur Rocketry (FAR) organization is offering an online training session for those interested in becoming licensed pyrotechnic operators in the state of California. The event requires registration on the FAR website and a fee paid to FAR ($10) to attend this two-hour introduction to the licensing and application process to be held on August 26th.

Friends of Amateur Rocketry website for indicating interest in pyro-op classes

Amateur rocketry in California is controlled by the same laws governing fireworks which require licensing by a state exam. The application forms and guidelines are available through the Office of the State Fire Marshal in the state of California (CALFIRE).

https://osfm.fire.ca.gov/divisions/fire-engineering-and-investigations/fireworks/

This training course for pyro-op applicants is another example of FAR and the RRS partnering to help the cause of amateur rocketry. The RRS, FAR and Rocketry Organization of California (ROC) last year met to create a joint set of recommendations to help CALFIRE improve the definitions used to govern amateur rocketry when CALFIRE they were seeking input from rocketry organizations. It is to the mutual benefit of the whole rocketry community and the public that there be more licensed pyro-op’s in amateur rocketry to both increase awareness of state laws and improve the culture of safety in our hobby and professions.

This FAR training course only serves to provide applicants with basic guidance on how to begin the application process and prepare to take the examination. Members of FAR, the RRS, ROC and any other amateur or model rocketry organization are welcome to apply. Several members of the RRS have already applied as the society continues its campaign to grow our ranks of licensed pyro-op’s at all three levels.

Completion of this training course does not substitute for any part of the pyro-op application process set by CALFIRE. As each applicant is required to pay their own fees including fingerprinting, they must also provide five letters of recommendation from licensed pyro-ops at or above the level of license being sought. After this class, each applicant must formally request these letters from state licensed pyro-ops in writing. For a licensed pyro-op to offer a letter of recommendation to an applicant, they must be willing to endorse their skills, knowledge and character to the state of California based on their personal experience with that individual. This is done through active participation at launch events through rocketry organizations having licensed pyro-ops leading their operations. Apprenticing, studying and attentiveness are all ways that a pyro-op can get to know an applicant personally and thus build confidence that the applicant is ready to have the responsibility of being licensed in rocketry. A letter of recommendation is given solely at the discretion of the licensed pyro-op which means their standards and expectations may vary significantly from others. It is important to establish a working relationship with both the society and the specific pyrotechnic operator over several projects to demonstrate skills and learn best practices through active participation.

As the RRS has more licensed pyro-ops than FAR at this time, this training course will be successful if both organizations support it. Some of the RRS pyro-ops have already offered their support as this means more people will need to become active with the RRS and conduct their projects at the MTA.

ROCKET LABORATORY AT THE COMPTON AIRPORT

Keith Yoerg announced that there is a tentative plan to create a rocket laboratory in a hangar at the Compton Airport, Although, the hangar will be used from time to time to store or service light aircraft, there is a great deal of working space which will help the RRS continue their liquid rocket project already underway. Several members of the RRS are also active with civil aviation and are members of Chapter 96 of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA 96). The EAA has generously supported the RRS over the last two years and we hope to continue and expand this partnership.

NEXT EVENT AT THE MOJAVE TEST AREA

The RRS has been planning the next event at the Mojave Test Area which will be dedicated to repairing some of our facilities including the adjustable rail launcher damaged in solid rocket launch explosion in August 2019. The consensus at the meeting was that we should not to return to the MTA for a formal launch event until the seasonal temperatures decrease from the excruciating desert summer. October 3rd was selected for this work event, Our hope is the weather will be cooler and we can accomplish more on that day. We may also take some time to search for more rockets planted downrange from past launch events.

The RRS may also conduct a few static firings or even a launch if member projects are ready. All such proposed hot-fire and launch activities must be proposed to the RRS president and the selected pyro-op in charge for that day. Some of our member projects such as Wolfram Blume’s Gas Guzzler two-stage ramjet and my second-build of the high-powered hybrid rocket are both still works in progress and may be ready for the early October launch date. Larry Hoffing has been working on an improved solid motor chemistry which he may want to test at the MTA.

The RRS is available for private events before that time, but one must make their request to the RRS president as usual. Some have indicated interest in returning to the site for just a few hours to recover more rockets downrange. Its our policy that at least two members be present for any excursions to the MTA and the RRS president must be notified in advance.

IN CLOSING

Some topics were not able to be covered including the overview of the new RRS Constitution as it gets ready for administrative membership review. Also, facility improvement plans at the RRS MTA including new restroom facilities and blockhouse should be discussed.

The next RRS meeting will be held by teleconference on September 11, 2020 as it is unlikely we will be permitted to return to the Ken Nakaoka Community Center by then. We hope everyone continues to stay safe during these days of the pandemic and try to stay in touch as we are planning another event at the MTA for October 3, 2020.

If there are any questions, please contact the RRS secretary.

secretary@rrs.org


July 2020 Meeting – *Virtual Only*

by Dave Nordling, Reaction Research Society, edited by Andrew Cortopassi, Secretary, Reaction Research Society

We held our monthly meeting of the Reaction Research Society (RRS) by teleconference on Friday, July 12, 2020.  Our treasurer, Chris Lujan, and our vice president, Frank Miuccio, called the meeting to order.

Since June 2020, we have made the teleconference feature a permanent part of all future meetings even after we ultimately return to in-person meetings at the Ken Nakaoka Community Center in Gardena.  Teleconferencing has allowed the RRS to better unite our far-flung membership from around the Los Angeles and neighboring areas and even those on travel.

July 2020 meeting of the RRS via teleconference

Due to the restrictions imposed by the continuing pandemic, the next RRS symposium will be held early next year in 2021. This was decided by the membership at the prior June 12 meeting.  Frank has not been able to schedule a date, but the society plans to hold the event a little earlier in the year (March 2021) than what was done in the prior events.  We remain optimistic that we can have a full exhibition and speaker series while adopting appropriate precautions.

New logo is in work for 2021 RRS symposium

Osvaldo, Larry and Dave became licensed pyrotechnic operators in rocketry for the society as of one year ago.  By law, this means that with the renewal of their annual license they can provide reference letters, wholly at their discretion, to other members seeking to pursue their own application to becoming a pyro-op.  The society roster of pyro-op’s is growing and this is good for both the society and amateur rocketry in general.  We have enjoyed the support of the California State Fire Marshal’s Office (CALFIRE) for many years and this has been helpful as we educate a new class of members in becoming responsible members of our hobby.  The more people know the law, the safer our community will be and the stronger our voice with the state becomes.

Dave Nordling announced his intent to become a rockets first-class pyro-op and will begin preparing his application.  Jim Gross, one of our pyro-op’s at the society offered his advice to all seeking their license that it is an important responsibility to uphold the law and protect the safety of everyone above all else.  The state exams are geared towards verifying a licensee understands the numerous hazards and safety concerns in addition to the state licensing processes and reporting requirements.   Every pyro-op must personally vouch for the person they are recommending.  This is often done by mentoring, apprenticeship or some form of repeated skills demonstration before the licensed pyro-op to show the applicant is knowledgeable, confident, mindful and vigilant in the safe handling of all operations and the people around them.  It is at the sole discretion of each pyro-op what their standard will be.  CALFIRE is also very helpful to those having questions about the process.

Waldo Stakes is holding a memorial for Mad Mike Hughes on Saturday, July 18, at noon, at the 247 Cafe in Lucerne Valley, CA.  Some of our members expressed interest in attending to pay their respects to Mike’s family and friends.  Mad Mike was killed on February 22 this year in the last flight of his self-built steam rocket outside of Amboy, California.

The RRS will be holding a launch event at the MTA on Saturday, July 25th.  This event will be for RRS members only and will be the first launch event held since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States in mid-March of this year.  Many have expressed their concerns in holding this event given several of or members are in at-risk categories either themselves or from within their household.  The counter-argument has been that given the wide open spaces around the MTA and the imposition of social distancing and wearing masks at all times, member safety can be maintained.  The society consensus was to proceed with the 7/25/2020 launch event.

Three micrograin alpha rockets and a beta will be launched at this 7/25/2020 event. John Krell will have built several high-speed datalogger prototypes that can fit within the tight confines of these alpha and beta aluminum payload tubes.  His earlier prototype datalogger was able to quickly and adequately sample the extremely high acceleration of an alpha at takeoff, although the 50G sensor range was exceeded across several consecutive samples.  The initial datalogger prototypes were recovered intact and could be reused.  Based on this success he will use a higher ranged accelerometer that will add greater detail to our knowledge of the micrograin rocket trajectory and provide additional data about apogee altitude and infer the rate of deceleration from impact.

Dave Nordling will also have two of the standard steel alpha nozzles with their internal flow paths ceramic coated.  This high temperature coating is used in the racing industry for piston coatings to extend their life.  A few years back this same coating from Specialized Coatings in Huntington Beach was proven on a recovered alpha nozzle showing zero erosion at the throat so we are confident of a repeated success.  Also, one of the alphas will use a longer propellant tube (4-foot) than what is the standard (3-foot).  We hope John’s dataloggers are able to capture good data from each of the alpha flights for valid comparison.  Also, capturing the trajectory of a beta rocket will be another important addition to the society knowledge base.

We discussed some of the history of different micrograin rocket experiments throughout the many decades of the society by several members.  Jim Gross offered to summarize his recollection of the many micrograin experiences into an article for RRS.ORG which will be posted soon we hope.

Larry, Dave and Osvaldo have made a second rocket ready for the Contrails H222 hybrid motor.  The nitrous oxide bottle should be re-charged and weighed in preparation for the launch event.  The recovery system has been added and reloading of the aluminum motor housing with an ignition system and hybrid fuel grain is the only step remaining.  Improvement to the igniter system was necessary after observing the high speed camera footage which will attempt to better sever the nylon filling line at the floating injector.  It was also recommended to add a small amount of paraffin wax to the forward end of the hybrid plastic fuel grain in an attempt to start the burn a little hotter when the nitrous oxide starts to flow.  Hybrid motors have been used successfully in model rocketry events but they have been known to be difficult to ignited and operate reliably.  It is the team’s intent share our learning with the society as we work toward success.

It was at this point, the discussion turned to oxidizers in general.  One of the earliest projects at the RRS was a rocket-grade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) monopropellant liquid that was built and flown in the 1950’s.  Hydrogen peroxide was explored again at the society many years later in a project to re-fly a monoprop rocket system.  Recent information was gathered from Peroxychem on the properties, handling and safety precautions required with having of rocket grade hydrogen peroxide.  As expected, the cost per volume of 90% HTP was very high and likely beyond the budget of an amateur project using anything more than a gallon.  The membership felt that there wasn’t sufficient interest in restarting a peroxide project, but some kind of summary article of peroxide properties and a collection of different members experience might be interesting.

Jim Gross mentioned his past experiments with nitric acid and its hypergolic reaction with furfuryl alcohol.  Regardless of the specific oxidizer, cleanliness and material compatibility of all wetted surfaces is of paramount importance in all experiments and projects.  Many people appreciate these hazards when it comes to liquid oxygen, but may not similarly appreciate the hazards with other oxidizers like nitrous oxide and caustics like nitric acid.  All oxidizers, even sulfur, must be treated with studious care and respect.

The 2020 Constitutional Committee is still due to present their draft for society membership review and comments.  An overview presentation will hopefully be made at the next meeting in August.  Updates to the language and policies have been needed for years in order to better describe how the society operates.  Ratification by the executive council should follow once all administrative members have had a chance to make their concerns known to our society.

In closing, Wolfram gave the society an update on his gasoline-fueled ramjet project, the Gas Guzzler.  He is making improvements to the flow path to enhance mixing and will continue with his benchtop experiments and analyses.  He is making progress but will not attend the 7/25/2020 due to the extreme heat in the Mojave desert.

Jim Gross reinforced this concern for all members to protect themselves against heat exhaustion while attending the MTA event.  Air temperatures can easily exceed 110 F at the peak of the Mojave afternoon.  Bringing a cooler with ice and cold beverages is essential as is sunscreen, a hat and light desert clothing.  Even those who have adapted themselves to the desert summer must take these precautions and be mindful of the condition of others.

We adjourned after 9PM as some of our members were retiring for the night.  Our in-person meetings must contend with the community center closing at this time, but with our meetings done virtually we can enjoy the extended meeting time together.  The next meeting will be again held by teleconference on Friday, August 14th.

Please contact the RRS secretary if there are any questions or concerns.
secretary@rrs.org

All members are responsible for keeping their contact information with society up to date and staying current on their annual dues with the RRS treasurer.
treasurer@rrs.org